Paula Stadiem (Pine Knoll Shores Realty) Real Estate Agent

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Paula Stadiem
location_on Pine Knoll Shores, NC — Pine Knoll Shores Realty
Get to Know Paula Stadiem

Paula Stadiem is a licensed North Carolina real estate broker/REALTOR®. A native of eastern North Carolina Paulais a fulltime resident of Pine Knoll Shores along with her husband.

Through the years Paula has had the opportunity to observe Carteret County´s phenomenal growth. Paula has watched Carteret County grow from a summer vacation place to a year round resort area.Paula graduated from Kinston High School in 1972 and attended Lenoir Community College. After twenty-five years as a housewife and mother she decided to join the work force. Paula received her salesman license in January of 1999 followed by her BROKERS license in March of 2000. Paulareceived her GRI (Graduate REALTOR® Institute) designation in March of 2002, ABR (Accredited Buyer Agency) designation in August of 2003 and her SRES (Senior Real Estate Specialist) designation in December 2004. As a hard working agent Paula has the honor of being Top Producer for Pine Knoll Shores Realty for 2003, 2004 and 2007. Paula has been an active member of the Real Estate community: 2004 and 2005 President of Women's Council of REALTORS®, 2007 President of the Carteret County Association of REALTORS and 2008 REALTOR of the Year Carteret County Association of REALTORS.

As a professional Real Estate agent Paula is dedicated to assisting you in your Real Estate needs. If you are selling or buying Paula will be by your side all the way.Paula can be reached at 1-800-605-8598, locally at 252-422-4220 or by e-mail at pstadiem@gmail.com  Website  http://www.paulastadiem.com/

Certifications

Understanding Agency   It's important to understand what legal responsibilities your real estate salesperson has to you and to other parties in the transactions. Ask your salesperson to explain what type of agency relationship you have with him or her and with the brokerage company.  1. Seller's representative (also known as a listing agent or seller's agent). A seller's agent is hired by and represents the seller. All fiduciary duties are owed to the seller. The agency relationship usually is created by a listing contract.2. Subagent. A subagent owes the same fiduciary duties to the agent's principal as the agent does. Subagency usually arises when a cooperating sales associate from another brokerage, who is not representing the buyer as a buyer's representative or operating in a nonagency relationship, shows property to a buyer. In such a case, the subagent works with the buyer as a customer but owes fiduciary duties to the listing broker and the seller. Although a subagent cannot assist the buyer in any way that would be detrimental to the seller, a buyer-customer can expect to be treated honestly by the subagent. It is important that subagents fully explain their duties to buyers.3. Buyer's representative (also known as a buyer's agent). A real estate licensee who is hired by prospective buyers to represent them in a real estate transaction. The buyer's rep works in the buyer's best interest throughout the transaction and owes fiduciary duties to the buyer. The buyer can pay the licensee directly through a negotiated fee, or the buyer's rep may be paid by the seller or by a commission split with the listing broker.4. Disclosed dual agent. Dual agency is a relationship in which the brokerage firm represents both the buyer and the seller in the same real estate transaction. Dual agency relationships do not carry with them all of the traditional fiduciary duties to the clients. Instead, dual agents owe limited fiduciary duties. Because of the potential for conflicts of interest in a dual-agency relationship, it's vital that all parties give their informed consent. In many states, this consent must be in writing. Disclosed dual agency, in which both the buyer and the seller are told that the agent is representing both of them, is legal in most states. 5. Designated agent (also called, among other things, appointed agency). This is a brokerage practice that allows the managing broker to designate which licensees in the brokerage will act as an agent of the seller and which will act as an agent of the buyer. Designated agency avoids the problem of creating a dual-agency relationship for licensees at the brokerage. The designated agents give their clients full representation, with all of the attendant fiduciary duties. The broker still has the responsibility of supervising both groups of licensees.   5 Reasons You Need a REALTOR®    1. A real estate transaction is complicated. In most cases, buying or selling a home requires   disclosure forms, inspection reports, mortgage documents, insurance policies, deeds,     and multi-page government-mandated settlement statements. A knowledgeable guide through this complexity can help you avoid delays or costly mistakes.  2. Selling or buying a home is time consuming. Even in a strong market, homes in our area stay on the market for an average of ____ days. And it usually takes another 60 days or so for the transaction to close after an offer is accepted.  3.  Real estate has its own language. If you don't know a CMA from a PUD, you can understand why it's important to work with someone who speaks that language.  4.  REALTORS®have done it before. Most people buy and sell only a few homes in a life time, usually with quite a few years in between each purchase. And even if you've done it before, laws and regulations change. That's why having an expert on your side is critical.  5.  REALTORS® provide objectivity. Since a home often symbolizes family, rest, and security, not just four walls and roof, homeselling or buying is often a very emotional undertaking. And for most people, a home is the biggest purchase they'll ever make. Having a concerned, but objective, third party helps you keep focused on both the business and emotional issues most important to you.  REALTORS® are members of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®, a trade organization of more than 1 million members nationwide. REALTORS® subscribe to a stringent code of ethics that helps guarantee the highest level of service and integrity.    10 Steps to Prepare for Homeownership  1. Decide how much home you can afford. Generally, you can afford a home equal in value to between two and three times your gross income.  2. Develop a wish list of what you'd like your home to have. Then prioritize the features on your list.  3. Select three or four neighborhoods you'd like to live in. Consider items such as schools, recreational facilities, area expansion plans, and safety.  4. Determine if you have enough saved to cover your downpayment and closing costs. Closing costs, including taxes, attorney's fee, and transfer fees average between 2 percent and 7 percent of the home price.  5. Get your credit in order. Obtain a copy of your credit report.  6. Determine how large a mortgage you can qualify for. Also explore different loans options and decide what's best for you.  7. Organize all the documentation a lender will need to preapprove you for a loan.  8. Do research to determine if you qualify for any special mortgage or downpayment-assistance programs.  9. Calculate the costs of homeownership, including property taxes, insurance, maintenance, and association fees, if applicable.  10. Find an experienced REALTOR® who can help you through the process.     8 Steps to Getting Your Finances in Order   1. Develop a family budget. Instead of budgeting what you'd like to spend, use receipts to create a budget for what you actually spent  over the last six months. One advantage of this approach is that it factors in unexpected expenses, such as car repairs, illnesses, etc., as well as predictable costs such as rent.  2. Reduce your debt. Generally speaking, lenders look for a total debt load of no more than 36 percent of income. Since this figure includes your mortgage, which typically ranges between 25 percent and 28 percent of income, you need to get the rest of installment debt-car loans, student loans, revolving balances on credit cards-down to between 8 percent and 10 percent of your total income.  3. Get a handle on expenses. You probably know how much you spend on rent and utilities, but little expenses add up. Try writing down everything you spend for one month. You'll probably see some great ways to save.  4. Increase your income. It may be necessary to take on a second, part-time job to get your income at a high-enough level to qualify for the home you want.  5. Save for a downpayment. Although it's possible to get a mortgage with only 5 percent down-or even less in some cases-you can usually get a better rate and a lower overall cost if you put down more. Shoot for saving a 20 percent downpayment.  6. Create a house fund. Don't just plan on saving whatever's left toward a downpayment.  Instead decide on a certain amount a month you want to save, then put it away as you pay your monthly bills.  7. Keep your job. While you don't need to be in the same job forever to qualify, having a job for less than two years may mean you have to pay a higher interest rate.  8. Establish a good credit history. Get a credit card and make payments by the due date. Do the same for all your other bills. Pay off the entire balance promptly.   How Big a Mortgage Can I Afford?   Not only does owning a home give you a haven for yourself and your family, it makes great financial sense, too.  This calculation assumes a 28 percent income tax bracket. If your bracket is higher, your savings will be, too.  Rent: _________________________  Multiplier: X       1.32  Mortgage payment: __________________  Because of tax deductions, you can make a mortgage payment-including taxes and insurance-that is approximately one-third larger than your current rent payment and end up with the same amount of income.  For more help, use Fannie Mae's online mortgage calculators at http://www.fanniemae.com/homebuyers/calculators/index.jhtml?p=Resources&s=Calculators  

 

7 Reasons to Own Your Own Home

 

 Tax breaks. The U.S. Tax Code lets you deduct the interest you pay on your mortgage, property taxes you pay, and some of the costs involved in buying your home.

 Gains. Between 1998 and 2002, national home prices increased at an average of 5.4 percent annually. And while there's no guarantee of appreciation, a 2001 study by the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORSÒ found that a typical homeowner has approximately $50,000 of unrealized gain in a home.

 Equity. Money paid for rent is money that you'll never see again, but mortgage payments let you build equity ownership interest in your home.

 Savings. Building equity in your home is a ready-made savings plan. And when you sell, you can generally take up to $250,000 ($500,000 for a married couple) as gain without owing any federal income tax.

 Predictability. Unlike rent, your mortgage payments don't go up over the years so your housing costs may actually decline as you own the home longer. However, keep in mind that property taxes and insurance costs will rise.

 Freedom. The home is yours. You can decorate any way you want and be able to benefit from your investment for as long as you own the home.

 Stability. Remaining in one neighborhood for several years gives you a chance to participate in community activities, lets you and your family establish lasting friendships, and offers your children the benefit of educational continuity.

 To calculate whether renting or buying is the best financial option for you; use this calculator courtesy of Ginnie Mae:

http://www.ginniemae.gov/rent_vs_buy/rent_vs_buy_calc.asp?Section=YPTH

 

Common Closing Costs for Buyers

  

The lender must disclose a good faith estimate of all settlement costs.  A check to cover your closing costs will probably have to be a cashier's check.  The title company or other entity conducting the closing will tell you the required amount for:

 

       Down payment        Loan origination fees        Points, or loan discount fees, you pay to receive lower interest       rate       Appraisal fee        Credit report        Private mortgage insurance premium        Insurance escrow for homeowners insurance, if being paid as part   of the mortgage.       Property tax escrow, if being paid as part of the mortgage.  Lenders keep funds for taxes and insurance in escrow accounts as they are paid with the mortgage, then they pay the insurance or taxes for you.       Deed recording fees      Title insurance policy premiums       Survey     Inspection fees-building inspection, termites, etc.       Notary fees      Prorations for your share of costs, such as utility bills and property taxes

 

A Note About Prorations: Because such costs are usually paid on either a monthly or yearly basis, you might have to pay a bill for services used by the sellers before they moved.  Prorationis a way for the sellers to pay you back or for you to pay them for bills they may have paid in advance.  For example, the gas company usually sends a bill each monthfor the gas used during the previous month.  But assume you buy the home on the 6th of the month.  You would owe the gas company for only the days from the 6th to the end of the month.  The seller would owe for the first five days.  The bill would be prorated for the number of days in the month and then each person would be responsible for the days of his or her ownership.

 

 

 

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Working with buyers, sellers and Senior Citizens at the Crystal Coast.